Todd PettigrewChange photo
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    By Shakespeare's time, the debate over legitimate medical practice had become vociferous and public. The powerful College of Physicians fought hard to discredit some and rein in others, but many resisted, denied, or ignored its authority.... more
    By Shakespeare's time, the debate over legitimate medical practice had become vociferous and public. The powerful College of Physicians fought hard to discredit some and rein in others, but many resisted, denied, or ignored its authority. Dramatists did not fail to notice the turmoil, nor did they fail to comment on it—and no one commented more profoundly on stage than William Shakespeare. Going beyond the usual questions posed about Shakespeare and medicine, this study, which won the first Jay L. Halio Prize in Shakespeare and Early Modern Studies, explores Shakespeare's response to the early modern struggle for control of English medical practice.

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    http://www2.lib.udel.edu/udpress/shakpractice.htm
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    Provides insights into early 17th C medical experience through careful examination of case histories.
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    Defends Bassanio's motives in Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice.
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    Explores Davies' writings through a lens he himself used, the notion of shamanstvo, the "enchanter quality."
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    It has long been a mystery why the unimpressive Doctor in The Merry Wives of Windsor should bear the name of the distinguished surgeon John Caius. This paper provides a solution.
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